Travel Basics – 2024 Austrian Grand Prix

Start planning your trip to the 2024 Austrian Grand Prix at the Red Bull Ring. Advice about visas, language and money.

The Republic of Austria (Republik Österreich), which has a population of close to 9 million, is a landlocked, mountainous country in central Europe bordered by eight countries, notably Germany, Italy and Hungary. The capital is the beautiful, historic city of Vienna and the official language is German. Austria is one of the thirteen richest countries in the world, with a per capita GDP just over $50,000 USD.

Austria Travel: Need to Know

  • Visas: Austria is a member of the Schengen zone, which is made up of 27 European countries (not including the UK & Ireland) with a common visa policy and no internal borders. Citizens of most Western nations are granted visa-free entry to countries within the Schengen zone for up to 90 days.
  • Timezone: Austria observes Central European Summer Time (CEST) in July when the Grand Prix is held, this is equivalent to GMT +1 hour (or UTC + 2 hours)
  • Electricity: Like much of Europe, Austria uses type F power plugs (230 V / 50 Hz) – carry a travel adapter if you are travelling from the UK, Australia or USA.
  • Drinking Water: Tap water in Austria is safe to drink.
  • In an Emergency: Dial 112. Operators speak German and English. Alternatively, you can dial 122 in case of a fire and 133 for the police.
  • Learn More: Austria Travel Official Website

Safety

Austria is generally a very safe country for tourists with one of the lowest crime rates of any European country. Nevertheless, it always pays to be vigilant, especially in crowded areas and on public transport, where pickpockets can operate. You shouldn’t have any issues at the Red Bull Ring, but don’t leave any valuables in your car if you are driving. Drunk fans are not uncommon, but they are generally harmless and there’s a strong trackside security presence

Health

If you are a European citizen, get yourself an EHIC card so you access Austrian healthcare services if the need arises. All fans travelling to the track should also have travel insurance in place, in case of an emergency. The official language of Austria is German, though English and other European languages are widely spoken, especially at the Red Bull Ring.

Money in Austria

Austria uses the EURO, which makes life a little easier for travelling F1 fans. Whilst it’s an expensive country by most standards, a trip to the Grand Prix doesn’t have to break the bank (see Budget Planner) and trackside prices are reasonable. Service is normally included in restaurant, taxi and other bills, but it’s customary to round up the bill if you are happy with the service. Find out more about the best credit cards for Europe.

Austrian Grand Prix Weather

The Red Bull Ring is located in the beautiful area of Styria, close to several areas popular for skiing in winter. It’s a very green area, which means that is rains a lot. Shielded by the Alps from the colder weather fronts that hit northern Europe, Styrian weather is more Mediterranean in nature. There is a good chance of some warm weather in the middle of summer when the race is held; temperatures around 25-30ºC (77- 86ºF) or even higher are not uncommon.

Been to the Austrian Grand Prix? Leave a comment with your travel tips!

15 thoughts on “Travel Basics – 2024 Austrian Grand Prix”

  1. Hi there,

    We are going to the race with a 1983 camper without turbo, coming from Holland. Can anyone tell us if the road to the track is very mountainous?
    We plan to travel the German A3 and from there A8/A9 in Austria.

    Thanks in advance,

    MJ

    1. There’s a few hills, but also plenty of tunnels. I think you should be fine as you have all motorways near the circuit. Good luck!

  2. Hi! Is this particular venue kid-friendly? We’ve been to the Australian GP with a tot and now we have two. Thoughts? We are also considering Montreal but Austria is one of our favorites. Any advice is appreciated.

    1. I’d have to say that Austria is one of the more kid-friendly tracks I have been to. Quite compact, though there are some hills. Good facilities, not too many fans. Recommended!

    1. Hi Camellia, getting travel insurance is a good idea whenever you go away. To protect yourself in case of injury or having something stolen. It shouldn’t cost too much, but is worth buying. Also important in times of COVID-19. You should be able to find out more in your home country and buy it there.

  3. Hi, I’m after a little bit of advice. I have tickets to Austria 2022 and battling the logistics of the flights to and from the UK. The only suitable flight out on Sunday night is at 20:15. I will have a hire car. Is this enough time from the end of race to getting on the plane?

    1. Where are you flying out from? If Graz airport, it may be doable. Not from Vienna. You would need more time. I’ve done this before and if you are worried about missing your flight, you won’t enjoy the end of the race. Better to fly out later or early the next month

    2. Can you pay by card at the track or is there a payment system like the tokens in Monza last year?

  4. Hi, I’m coming to the F1 this year. We will be travelling from Vienna with our luggage, is there any place to store luggage for a fee? Or anywhere you suggest nearby – we are travelling by train to Knittelfeld. Thanks in advance, Jack.

    1. Not sure, Jack. It’s possible there will be some luggage storage facilities at Knittelfeld train station. If not, suggest asking there and maybe they can point you to a nearby hotel or sth that can store your bags. I don’t believe there are any luggage storage facilities at the track itself.

  5. How early should we arrive to the track on race day? The race is at 3pm. Is the train ride from Graz very difficult on race day, versus a shuttle that leaves Graz at 8am (seems too early for a 3pm race)?

    1. It’s entirely up to you. If you have your allocated seats and don’t want to watch the support races, it may actually be easier to arrive later and avoid the crowds of people (most will arrive between 8-11am I guess). I can’t comment on the train ride from Graz, but it should be fine if you leave later than everyone else. Info about getting to the circuit is covered here

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